#PointShoot Week #41

30 January 2018

Do you love making photos of your family? Do you like to record the everyday memories you are making? Then #PointShoot could be the linky for you. Come and share your photo story posts with me. 

You can share days out snaps or a fun, special, or touching moment from your week. It can be one photo (including Instagram posts) or a series of shots with words or without.


This week's featured post comes from Ross @ Isablog with this gorgeous capture.



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A photograph is the pause button of life.

We are open from Tuesday 6 a.m. until Friday 6 a.m. (so there is plenty of time to link up.)


Link up your weekend pictures!






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20 activities to get children enjoying Nature

26 January 2018

Dear friend,

Did you know that inmates spend more time outside than kids? I was shocked when I saw this report from BBC Newsnight. Robert Macfarlane and Jackie Morris spoke to BBC Newsnight about their book, The Lost Words.

The Lost Words explains how all over the country, there are words disappearing from children's lives. Words like Dandelion, Otter, Bramble, Acorn and Lark represent the natural world of childhood and sadly this vocabulary is being lost.

Children need to spend more time interacting with the natural world. A recent study of 2,000 parents commissioned by the Eco Attractions Group found that just half of children have built sandcastles at the beach, with a similar number saying they've never had a picnic outside.



Nature is good for kids’ minds.

  • It builds confidence 
  • It promotes creativity and imagination 
  • It teaches responsibility 
  • It provides different stimulation 
  • It gets kids moving. 
  • It makes them think 
  • It reduces stress and fatigue

Children who play outside develop better language skills, are fitter and have fewer behavioural problems. Research shows that children also use five times as many words when they play outdoors and we know that there is a direct correlation between obesity and lack of time spent outside.

I have two computer mad boys but every weekend we get them out from behind their screens and explore nature. It enables us to spend quality time together. I think it is a really important part of our family life and miss our adventures if the weather is too wet or one of us is sick. Getting out into nature doesn't need to cost a lot either. There are plenty of activities you can do that cost nothing.

20 activities to get children enjoying Nature

  1. Camp out
  2. Go Bird watching
  3. Go on a Treasure Hunt/Scavenger Hunt
  4. Share a skill; skim a stone, make a daisy chain, blow a grass whistle
  5. Be a Nature Detective
  6. Take Photos
  7. Make a bird feeder
  8. Collect seeds, pine cones, nuts for a craft activity
  9. Make a mud kitchen
  10. Go for a picnic
  11. Put on wellies and splash in puddles
  12. Plant a garden
  13. Go on a MiniBeast hunt
  14. Make a nature map
  15. Build a fort
  16. Watch the clouds
  17. Climb a tree
  18. Go for a bike ride
  19. Make a collection
  20. Make a nature notebook

What would you add to the list? 

#PointShoot Week #40

23 January 2018

Do you love making photos of your family? Do you like to record the everyday memories you are making? Then #PointShoot could be the linky for you. Come and share your photo story posts with me. 

You can share days out snaps or a fun, special, or touching moment from your week. It can be one photo (including Instagram posts) or a series of shots with words or without.


This week's featured post comes from the lovely Catherine at misspmeetsworld I just loved this idea of an annual family photo!



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A photograph is the pause button of life.

We are open from Tuesday 6 a.m. until Friday 6 a.m. (so there is plenty of time to link up.)


Link up your weekend pictures!









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Autism: Don't say my son looks normal

17 January 2018

Dear Friend,

My son has autism, he is doing his best to fit into a world that can be extremely confusing to him. Problems arise when we meet new people because his disability is invisible. 

Although, I don't want my son to have to wear an armband or badge to show his disability I do tell people we meet, that he is autistic, in the hope that they will show patience. 

Often the person will reply with: He looks normal or Really, you can't tell or some other platitude...

Contrary to what you may think, platitudes are not a compliment. 

Initially, I wanted to reply; Well, you look intelligent... 
or 
I didn't know that you were a child psychologist?

There is no mark of autism, no tell tale sign. Hans Asperger noted that many of his patients were strikingly beautiful with large eyes and Scientists are conducting research into identifying autism using facial scanning techniques but to the naked eye there is nothing to see.
Saying my son looks normal is at best stereotyping and at worst shows you are ready to judge people simply based on their looks.


We went through a long and very difficult process to get the right diagnosis for our son. We did not do this lightly. We recognised that he was having problems that were affecting his day to day life in a big way. I do not need to list my son's autistic credentials to make you believe he is autistic, we know he is...
By saying my son looks normal, you are trivialising his difficulties and questioning my parenting!
But I honestly believe that by saying, you can't tell... most people (in a clumsy way) are trying to show support.

Actually it shows ignorance.

In 2015 the National Autistic Society carried out a YouGov poll and found that more than 99.5% of people in the UK had heard of autism... BUT... In the same YouGov poll just 16% of autistic people and their families said that the public had a meaningful understanding of autism. 
By saying my son looks normal it demonstrates a basic lack of understanding of what autism is
It is time that we challenge the myths, misconceptions and stereotypes that mean that 79% of autistic people feel socially isolated. If you do not understand something then ask.

I love this quote from the inspirational Maya Angelou:
If you are always trying to be normal you will never know how amazing you can be. 
My son is unique, an out of the box thinker, has an eye for detail, is funny, caring and tenacious, he is anything but normal, he is amazing!
Isn't 'normal' overrated? 
Perhaps my son does appear 'normal' to you but you spend a short amount of time in his company and he is very clever as he has learned how to behave around others, how to respond as expected. I know how much effort and energy this takes out of him. It must be exhausting spending your life acting the way people want, following the many social rules that seem like a foreign language.

Occasionally the act slips or he makes a mistake then people react with disappointment. Why is he behaving like that?
He has autism!
You can make a change. If you meet someone with autism. Be kind, be patient and smile. And don't belittle their challenges by normalising them.

Next time someone tells me my son looks normal, I'm going to say;
 No he isn't Normal he's extraordinary!
Autism is our normal...

More posts about autism...

#PointShoot Week #39

16 January 2018

Do you love making photos of your family? Do you like to record the everyday memories you are making? Then #PointShoot could be the linky for you. Come and share your photo story posts with me. 


You can share days out snaps or a fun, special, or touching moment from your week. It can be one photo (including Instagram posts) or a series of shots with words or without.

This week's featured post comes from Susan K Mann



Feel free to grab your featured blogger badge!





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A photograph is the pause button of life.

We are open from Tuesday 6 a.m. until Friday 6 a.m. (so there is plenty of time to link up.)


Link up your weekend pictures!







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Winning

10 January 2018

Dear Friend,

Yesterday, he lost...

I could feel his frustration building during the game. It was a simple game of luck, one which he had no control over.

With each spin of the dial he moved further away from safety and edged closer to a meltdown.

My boy has never played fantasy games, he has never played with figures or toys. Except for a dizzy (from Bob the Builder) which he took everywhere with him and constantly spun the bucket. He lined things up or whizzed cars down a ramp over and over again.

But as he got older we purposefully bought board games that we could play together to support his social development.

He has always had a deep seated desire to win, a need to be right.

We first noticed it when he was very young. Initially I blamed myself. Had telling him to always do his best been counterproductive?

But I knew it was more than that...



His rigidity of thinking means that to him it is essential to always win and that anything else means failure. He simply does not understand that not everyone can win all the time.

It isn’t always fun for us, especially for his brother. We have tried to explain that Alex would like to win sometimes too because he lacks the theory of mind to see this himself.

Seeing his anxiety build is heartbreaking but it also makes me feel frustration. Again we are denied a peaceful afternoon of play. Again my son is left distraught. Again my youngest son is distressed, confused.

My son is trapped beneath the immense weight of his own expectations.

Yesterday he lost...
We all lost!


A glimpse into autism is a series of short letters that explore the impact autism has on our family on a day to day basis. Disclaimer: this is our experience not all autistic people are the same.


More autism awareness posts...

#PointShoot week #38

9 January 2018

Do you love making photos of your family? Do you like to record the everyday memories you are making? Then #PointShoot could be the linky for you. Come and share your photo story posts with me. 


You can share days out snaps or a fun, special, or touching moment from your week. It can be one photo (including Instagram posts) or a series of shots with words or without.

New for 2018: Facebook group for all #PointShoot Bloggers.

I would love you to come and join me over on Facebook. Here we can share posts, tips, ideas and generally make more of our community. It is nice to see so many regulars joining up here and I hope we can support and get to know each other better over on Facebook too.

This week's featured post comes from Renovation Bay-Bee


Feel free to grab your featured blogger badge!





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A photograph is the pause button of life.

We are open from Tuesday 6 a.m. until Friday 6 a.m. (so there is plenty of time to link up.)


Link up your weekend pictures!








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One Moment in Time with Life, Love and Dirty Dishes

3 January 2018

Welcome to one moment in time, a guest posts series, where bloggers share the stories behind special or significant photographs. Welcome to Claire from Life, Love and Dirty Dishes. I was so happy when Claire contacted me as I love her blog and the way she tells her tales of parenting with a sparkle in her eye and a good dash of humour. Thanks for joining me!


Oh this photo!  It is far from the nicest photo I have of my two boys.  It’s not the best quality or composition.  There are no smiles, in fact they look downright miserable (they were).  But it absolutely captures a moment in time, it tells a story.

This photo was taken Five days in to the Big one having a mild case of the Chickenpox and about Five days before the Little one got a severe case of the Chickenpox.   Five days of being confined to the house had taken their toll.  Everyone was grumpy and fed up.  Even the weather matched our moods with storm Doris raging outside. 



Big couldn’t understand why I wouldn’t let him go to school.  He was devastated to be missing his class assembly.  He was supposed to be a narrator and welcomes any chance to be the centre of attention.  He was in full on meltdown mode about it all and was past the point of reasoning.  Pushing my patience to the limit he was sent to the naughty step to calm down. 

Of course, where ever Big goes Little follows, and he joined Big on the naughty step and displayed the same attitude in a show of solidarity for his beloved big brother.  Matching frown to boot.

It was one of those moments when they were both staring at me with their big blue eyes and faces of thunder, that I couldn’t help but laugh at the absurdity of it.  You earn some badges of honour as a parent; being puked on, scooping poo out of the bath, surviving nits.  I knew in that moment that Chickenpox was one of those stories we would later laugh about, and it wasn’t going to beat us.

After I took this photo I tickled them senseless until everyone was giggling, then we ate ice cream and watched The Lego Movie for the 57th time that week snuggled on the sofa with a duvet and the aroma of calamine lotion.

Now when I look back on this photo, it always makes me smile.  It reminds me that parenting is sometimes tough, but we get through it, and we can always turn a situation around. 

It also reminds me that these two have each other’s backs, and when Daddy is at work I will always be outnumbered and outwitted!


You can read about our time in the Chickenpox house over on my blog.


Find Claire on...

Twitter:  @lifeloveanddd
Instagram:  lifeloveanddirtydishes


Do you have a special photograph and story you would like to share? Then I would love to hear from you!




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If you would like to join in One Moment in Time please DM me. I am looking for new guest posters now!

More from One Moment in Time...

Photography @My_Dutch_Angle

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